Proper 9 – Year B (2018)

1 Sam 3:1–10, (11–20); Ps 139:1–5, 12–17; 2 Cor 4:5–12; Mk 2:23–3:6

Rev. Dr. Tim Connor

We are called not to lose heart in the exercise of our faith, even when we feel worn out by the pressures of daily life. Our vocation is to worship, serve and proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ. He stands at the centre of everything we do and say. Conforming to Christ is the work He does in us, called out of darkness into light.

Pentecost – Year B (2018)

Ezek 37:1–14; Psalm 104:25–35,37b; Acts 2:1–21; John 15:26–27,16:4b–15

Rev. Dr. Tim Connor

Two gifts of the Holy Spirit are life and speech: we receive the breath of life and the courage and words to testify to God’s wonder and majesty. With the disciples we proclaim the miracle of Christ’s life, death and resurrection.
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Easter VI – Year B (2018)

Acts 10:44-48; Psalm 98; 1 John 5:1-6; John 15:9-17

Rev. Dr. Tim Connor

Throughout this Easter season we continue to reflect on the love of God. To abide in God’s love is to dwell, to feel protected, to have a secure place from which we interact with the world around us. In Him, we experience a love that is unconditional, regardless of how we feel about our own worthiness. It takes us to a place of joy, of gladness and light. We are called to respond by following the command to love one another, as we are loved, through simple acts of service.

Easter V – Year B (2018)

Acts 8:26-40; Psalm 22:24-30; 1 John 4:7-21 John 15:1-8

Rev. Andrew Rampton

We live our lives in response to a God who reveals Himself to us in a love, freely given, that manifests itself to us in action. If we really know that love we respond in action, doing good works for others. It does not come easily but is in loving others that we understand how we are loved.

Easter IV – Year B (2018)

Acts 4:5-12; Psalm 23; 1 John 3:16-24; John 10:11-18

Rev. Dr. Tim Connor

Perhaps the best known and loved passage of scripture, Psalm 23 paints an image of the God who cares for us, gives us life, protects us and blesses us generously. Jesus’ declaration as the Good Shepard is unsettling in that through it he claims his own divinity and foretells his sacrifice on behalf of all of us.